August 24, 2014

imaginingcities:

Three groups shared a day of public creativity in which a blind wall gave the inspiration for the construction of a temporary collective place. A residual space is reactivated to give life to new situations, to encourage casual encounters, and to become a starting point for a new view of the city of Rome. 

More here.

asylum-art:

Belgium’s  Flower Carpet Festival 

The Flower Carpet Festival is a popular event that takes place in Grand-Place Brussels every other year. Since 1971 over 600,000 Begonias flowers are arranged in an intense pattern filling the city square with a powerful and graphic carpet made entirely out of flowers. Taking months of planning to produce (with only 48 hours of install time) the event brings together landscape architects, technicians and hundreds of voluntary participants weave the flowers in place for the five day event!

(via landsthetica)

August 4, 2014
In the midst of a culture that is rationally organized for a vocational workaday life, there is hardly any room for the cultivation of acosmic brotherliness, unless it is among strata who are economically carefree. Under the technical and social conditions of rational culture, an imitation of the life of Buddha, Jesus, or Francis seems condemned to failure for purely external reasons.
Max Weber - Essays in Sociolgy (via sociology-of-space)

urbangeographies:

CREATIVE PLACE-MAKING AND PUBLIC ART:  Murals in Balmy Alley, San Francisco

San Francisco’s Mission District now boasts a remarkable concentration of over a hundred community-based murals, painted by local artists on buildings, walls, and fences. Inspired initially by Diego Rivera and other great Mexican muralists, the street art gradually grew to incorporate graffiti, underground comics, and avante-garde forms to form an iconoclastic mixture of genres.

Local cultural centers, influenced by the Chicano political movement, have sought to define the Mission District as Latino cultural space. The Mujeres Muralistas collective, for example, began in 1971 to paint murals on the fences and garages of Balmy Alley, often depicting political struggles in Central America and elsewhere. Now more than thirty colorful murals line Balmy Alley, as you can see here.

Some of the murals take up local political themes, such as the diptych critique of gentrification, with corner credits, in the lower three images. Such spectacular works of public art provide a vivid sense of place in San Francisco’s Mission District. These and other artists have given rise to what is sometimes called the “Mission School,” which combines classic Mexican mural styles with a range of postmodern sensibilities.

References:  Timothy Drescher, “Street Subversion: The Political Geography of Murals and Graffiti,” in Reclaiming San Francisco: History, Politics, Culture, ed. James Brook, Chris Carlsson, and Nancy J. Peters (San Francisco:  City Lights Books, 1998), 231-245; and ed. Annice Jacoby, Street Art San Francisco: Mission Muralismo (New York: Abrams, 2009).

Photos:  B. Godfrey, June 2014 

August 3, 2014

designed-for-life:

image The Vertical Garden can be used as an impressive outdoor system, or can be used indoors, with the help of artificial lighting. The natural benefits of vertical gardens are many: improved air quality, lower energy consumption, providing a natural shield between weather and inhabitants. No matter where you live, urban or suburban, cold or hot, indoors or out, a vertical garden brings a little bit of green to all. ViaimageFacebook | Instagram | Twitter | Subscribe

(via landsthetica)

land8:

This striking new pocket park in Barcelona was designed and built for less than $4 per square foot! http://bit.ly/1j745cY

(via urbnist)

July 30, 2014

sixtensason:

Marc Peter Keane, Teahouse Project at Cornell University, next to the The Herbert F. Johnson Museum, Ithaca, 2003

“The tea ceremonies of Japan are conceived in the spirit of the Taoist earthly paradise. The tearoom, called ‘the abode of fancy,’ is an ephemeral structure, built to enclose a moment of poetic intuition. Called too ‘the abode of vacancy,’ it is devoid of ornamentation. Temporarily it contains a single picture or flower-arrangement. The teahouse is called ‘the abode of the unsymmetrical’: the unsymmetrical suggests movement; the purposely unfinished leaves a vacuum into which the imagination of the beholder can pour.

The guest approaches by the garden path, and must stoop through the low entrance. He makes obeisance to the picture or flower-arrangement, to the singing kettle, and takes his place on the floor. The simplest object, framed by the controlled simplicity of the teahouse, stands out in mysterious beauty, its silence holding the secret of temporal existence. Each guest is permitted to complete the experience in relation to himself. The members of the company thus contemplate the universe in miniature, and become aware of their hidden fellowship with the immortals.” —Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces

(Source: courses.cit.cornell.edu)

July 3, 2012

Instead of a world of transactions it’s a world of relationships. People want to be part of what they’re actually buying or participating in.

“It’s for people to decide; not one person in a suit, typically using a risk model which is 20 years old that has no idea how the market is evolving.

Slava Rubin, founder of IndieGoGo

(Source: sanjose.com)

February 3, 2012
myneighbourjonoro:

forgotten songs, by J.W_Collins.
A permanent art installation set in Angel Place, Sydney, by Michael Thomas Hill. Forgotten Songs commemorates the songs of fifty birds once heard in central Sydney before they were gradually forced out of the city by European settlement. The calls, which filter down from the canopy of birdcages suspended above Angel Place, change as day shifts to night; the daytime birds’ songs disappearing with the sun and those of the nocturnal birds which inhabited the area sounding into the evening.

myneighbourjonoro:

forgotten songs, by J.W_Collins.

A permanent art installation set in Angel Place, Sydney, by Michael Thomas Hill.

Forgotten Songs commemorates the songs of fifty birds once heard in central Sydney before they were gradually forced out of the city by European settlement. The calls, which filter down from the canopy of birdcages suspended above Angel Place, change as day shifts to night; the daytime birds’ songs disappearing with the sun and those of the nocturnal birds which inhabited the area sounding into the evening.

avantgardisticmeans:

No Chairs on the Street!?
The artist Doris Salcedo protests with this elaborate installation consisting of 1.600 chairs against the ‘no chair’ rule in the entertainment district of Istanbul. Impressive art and at the same time a meaningful statement. I really like! 

avantgardisticmeans:

No Chairs on the Street!?

The artist Doris Salcedo protests with this elaborate installation consisting of 1.600 chairs against the ‘no chair’ rule in the entertainment district of Istanbul. Impressive art and at the same time a meaningful statement. I really like! 

theoriginalchingy:

Why the Places We Live Make Us Happy - “We find that the design and conditions of cities are associated with the happiness of residents in 10 urban areas. Cities that provide easy access to convenient public transportation and to cultural and leisure amenities promote happiness. Cities that are affordable and serve as good places to raise children also have happier residents. We suggest that such places foster the types of social connections that can improve happiness and ultimately enhance the attractiveness of living in the city.”
via The Atlantic.

theoriginalchingy:

Why the Places We Live Make Us Happy - “We find that the design and conditions of cities are associated with the happiness of residents in 10 urban areas. Cities that provide easy access to convenient public transportation and to cultural and leisure amenities promote happiness. Cities that are affordable and serve as good places to raise children also have happier residents. We suggest that such places foster the types of social connections that can improve happiness and ultimately enhance the attractiveness of living in the city.”

via The Atlantic.

February 2, 2012

pafp:

Spotlight: Heather and Ivan Morison

There are a multitude of visual artists in this day and age, but very few seem to capture as many critical and contemporary issues in their work as Heather and Ivan Morison do.  It is through a wide variety of mediums—including sculpture, installation, video, sound, print and puppetry—that the two manage to create works to facilitate the engagement of their audience.  For the most part, each of their pieces is found in a public setting and perhaps what is most strikingly uniform of all their work is their ability to formulate discussion.  Each, in some way, shape or form, contribute to a very much post-modern ideal in creating community dialogue. Each installation demands attention—whether the audience wants to pay any consideration or not they are dragged in.  Their work helps to change perspectives and often leave one with a different view of their surroundings. 

Among the many subjects the Morisons cover within their body of work, three themes seem to arise that, unavoidably, lead to this audience participation and dialogue.  One is their interest in the relationship between the arts and ecology, another is their fascination with methods of survival; keeping aware that all is temporary and the necessity to react accordingly when intervenedFinally, it is their belief in the significance of placemaking and awareness of a site that further highlights Heather and Ivan Morison’s undeniable ability to create public discourse, ultimately proving their relevance in today’s art scene and beyond.  They are truly at the forefront of contemporary art in that they create works that are not only relevant, but become a part of the viewer’s life by way of the engagement and discussion they create.

Above are just a few of the Morisons’ works that exhibit each of these qualities. For more information visit them online at: www.morison.info

February 1, 2012

vikingpenguinbooks:

Feeling the Earth Move: Urban Sidewalk Liquid Intervention

The normal urban environment is hard, angular and not often playful. We go about our business with the type of calculated indifference cultivated through years of city dwelling. But when that cold, hard environment suddenly changes unexpectedly, we have no choice but to snap out of our collective reverie and take notice. That is precisely what happened when residents of Bourges, France came upon a highly unusual section of sidewalk.

more at WebUrbanist