October 2, 2014
publicdesignfestival:

The process of city-making belongs to citizens today more than yesterday: communities take ownership of their environment and by means of low resources, awareness and creativity answer their needs. Handmade Urbanism focuses on five emerging cities -Mumbai, Cape Town, Mexico City, Istanbul and São Paulo - and describes the potential of urban transformation embedded in small-scale initiatives.

publicdesignfestival:

The process of city-making belongs to citizens today more than yesterday: communities take ownership of their environment and by means of low resources, awareness and creativity answer their needs. Handmade Urbanism focuses on five emerging cities -Mumbai, Cape Town, Mexico City, Istanbul and São Paulo - and describes the potential of urban transformation embedded in small-scale initiatives.

(via sociology-of-space)

September 4, 2014

urbanfunscape:

The Dérive App ”gets you lost in your city and lets you share that experience with others.” It does this by serving up task cards calling users to search for architectural, urban, or social points of interest, such as following taxi, moving towards the river, taking a seat in the park, or finding a tree, say the creators. Users can create their own “decks” and form groups where members collect their experiences online. The app was developed by Eduardo Cachucho, Babak Fakhamzadeh, Ian Barry, and Nora Noone. 

(via sociology-of-space)

August 31, 2014

thisbigcity:

publicdesignfestival:

The act of lying in public space is often uncommon or (worse still) prohibited. Not in the park of the Museum of Architecture in Wrocław (Poland), where Mikołaj Smoleński has upset ordinary. Within the sixth edition of Archi-box series, he has created Polegiwacz, a temporary architecture designed to lie down and relax. 

Photos by Krzystof Smyk _ All rights reserved.

Want to go to there.

imaginingcities:

In 2007, In 2007 London’s National Gallery teamed up with creative agency The Partners to promote the gallery’s permanent collection of over 2,300 paintings. How do you get people to come indoors on a sunny day and see the art inside the gallery? Design experts The Partners turned the brief on its head, and instead brought the paintings outside to people on the street.

For 12 weeks during the summer, life-size high quality replicas of 45 of the National Gallery’s most famous paintings were hung about the streets of London. Complete with ornate frames and helpful information plaques as you find alongside the real artworks, the city itself became a giant art gallery.

A range of tours were offered, including ‘Lunchtime Tours’ designed to fit in with the hour-long breaks of workers in the city. By taking busy office workers around their own buildings, the tour made them reconsider the artworks as well as their own city. Each tour was supplemented by a downloadable interactive map as well as audio guides, downloadable from the gallery’s website.

Placing the paintings in a different context, viewers were able to interact with the art in a new way, with the whole experience being deliberately more modern and interactive.

More here

August 28, 2014

thisbigcity:

Tree stumps turned into a library transformed this Berlin street, and inspired similar projects in cities across the globe. 

We investigate in our latest post

August 24, 2014

imaginingcities:

Three groups shared a day of public creativity in which a blind wall gave the inspiration for the construction of a temporary collective place. A residual space is reactivated to give life to new situations, to encourage casual encounters, and to become a starting point for a new view of the city of Rome. 

More here.

asylum-art:

Belgium’s  Flower Carpet Festival 

The Flower Carpet Festival is a popular event that takes place in Grand-Place Brussels every other year. Since 1971 over 600,000 Begonias flowers are arranged in an intense pattern filling the city square with a powerful and graphic carpet made entirely out of flowers. Taking months of planning to produce (with only 48 hours of install time) the event brings together landscape architects, technicians and hundreds of voluntary participants weave the flowers in place for the five day event!

(via landsthetica)

August 4, 2014
In the midst of a culture that is rationally organized for a vocational workaday life, there is hardly any room for the cultivation of acosmic brotherliness, unless it is among strata who are economically carefree. Under the technical and social conditions of rational culture, an imitation of the life of Buddha, Jesus, or Francis seems condemned to failure for purely external reasons.
Max Weber - Essays in Sociolgy (via sociology-of-space)

urbangeographies:

CREATIVE PLACE-MAKING AND PUBLIC ART:  Murals in Balmy Alley, San Francisco

San Francisco’s Mission District now boasts a remarkable concentration of over a hundred community-based murals, painted by local artists on buildings, walls, and fences. Inspired initially by Diego Rivera and other great Mexican muralists, the street art gradually grew to incorporate graffiti, underground comics, and avante-garde forms to form an iconoclastic mixture of genres.

Local cultural centers, influenced by the Chicano political movement, have sought to define the Mission District as Latino cultural space. The Mujeres Muralistas collective, for example, began in 1971 to paint murals on the fences and garages of Balmy Alley, often depicting political struggles in Central America and elsewhere. Now more than thirty colorful murals line Balmy Alley, as you can see here.

Some of the murals take up local political themes, such as the diptych critique of gentrification, with corner credits, in the lower three images. Such spectacular works of public art provide a vivid sense of place in San Francisco’s Mission District. These and other artists have given rise to what is sometimes called the “Mission School,” which combines classic Mexican mural styles with a range of postmodern sensibilities.

References:  Timothy Drescher, “Street Subversion: The Political Geography of Murals and Graffiti,” in Reclaiming San Francisco: History, Politics, Culture, ed. James Brook, Chris Carlsson, and Nancy J. Peters (San Francisco:  City Lights Books, 1998), 231-245; and ed. Annice Jacoby, Street Art San Francisco: Mission Muralismo (New York: Abrams, 2009).

Photos:  B. Godfrey, June 2014 

August 3, 2014

designed-for-life:

image The Vertical Garden can be used as an impressive outdoor system, or can be used indoors, with the help of artificial lighting. The natural benefits of vertical gardens are many: improved air quality, lower energy consumption, providing a natural shield between weather and inhabitants. No matter where you live, urban or suburban, cold or hot, indoors or out, a vertical garden brings a little bit of green to all. ViaimageFacebook | Instagram | Twitter | Subscribe

(via landsthetica)

land8:

This striking new pocket park in Barcelona was designed and built for less than $4 per square foot! http://bit.ly/1j745cY

(via urbnist)

July 30, 2014

sixtensason:

Marc Peter Keane, Teahouse Project at Cornell University, next to the The Herbert F. Johnson Museum, Ithaca, 2003

“The tea ceremonies of Japan are conceived in the spirit of the Taoist earthly paradise. The tearoom, called ‘the abode of fancy,’ is an ephemeral structure, built to enclose a moment of poetic intuition. Called too ‘the abode of vacancy,’ it is devoid of ornamentation. Temporarily it contains a single picture or flower-arrangement. The teahouse is called ‘the abode of the unsymmetrical’: the unsymmetrical suggests movement; the purposely unfinished leaves a vacuum into which the imagination of the beholder can pour.

The guest approaches by the garden path, and must stoop through the low entrance. He makes obeisance to the picture or flower-arrangement, to the singing kettle, and takes his place on the floor. The simplest object, framed by the controlled simplicity of the teahouse, stands out in mysterious beauty, its silence holding the secret of temporal existence. Each guest is permitted to complete the experience in relation to himself. The members of the company thus contemplate the universe in miniature, and become aware of their hidden fellowship with the immortals.” —Joseph Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces

(Source: courses.cit.cornell.edu)

July 3, 2012

Instead of a world of transactions it’s a world of relationships. People want to be part of what they’re actually buying or participating in.

“It’s for people to decide; not one person in a suit, typically using a risk model which is 20 years old that has no idea how the market is evolving.

Slava Rubin, founder of IndieGoGo

(Source: sanjose.com)

February 3, 2012
myneighbourjonoro:

forgotten songs, by J.W_Collins.
A permanent art installation set in Angel Place, Sydney, by Michael Thomas Hill. Forgotten Songs commemorates the songs of fifty birds once heard in central Sydney before they were gradually forced out of the city by European settlement. The calls, which filter down from the canopy of birdcages suspended above Angel Place, change as day shifts to night; the daytime birds’ songs disappearing with the sun and those of the nocturnal birds which inhabited the area sounding into the evening.

myneighbourjonoro:

forgotten songs, by J.W_Collins.

A permanent art installation set in Angel Place, Sydney, by Michael Thomas Hill.

Forgotten Songs commemorates the songs of fifty birds once heard in central Sydney before they were gradually forced out of the city by European settlement. The calls, which filter down from the canopy of birdcages suspended above Angel Place, change as day shifts to night; the daytime birds’ songs disappearing with the sun and those of the nocturnal birds which inhabited the area sounding into the evening.